Coronavirus resources


People and organisations in Scotland, the UK and around the world have produced a huge number of resources to support children and young people during the pandemic.

It’s a difficult time for people of all ages, but one children and young people may find especially difficult. The resources collected here include those that can support the right to the best physical and mental health possible by providing information about coronavirus and worries around the pandemic.

Resources for children

Childline has people you can talk to at any time of day about any worries that you have. They’ll listen to you about what you have to say.

CBBC Newsround has lots of videos and advice for you if you’re worried about coronavirus. It’s also has a page of advice for you if you’re worried by events in the news.

The illustrator of the Gruffalo Axel Scheffler has drawn pictures for a free online book designed to explain coronavirus to children.

The World Health Organisation has produced a book for children designed to help them cope with the coronavirus pandemic.

Resources for young people

Young Scot’s Coronavirus website is a brilliant and regularly updated resource that can support young people and help young people support others.

The Mental Health charity Mind have detailed advice on supporting your mental health during the coronavirus pandemic, including tips about how to support yourself during the winter.

Our young adviser Eilidh has blogged on her top 10 ways to keep busy during lockdown.

Our Independent Children’s Rights Impact Assessment webpages lay out some of the ways in which your human rights have been affected by coronavirus laws and policies.

Resources for adults

15 Stories are the stories of 15 families told to Children’s Parliament to record and reflect on how families with children under the age of 8 have experienced these past tumultuous months.  

CRIN are collecting examples from around the world of how the pandemic and its spread are impacting the rights of under 18s.

Parenting across Scotland’s resources for families have a huge amount of information and activities to help parents and carers support their children.

Our list of recommended reading for younger human rights defenders provides suggestions of books about human rights you might like to read with your children. If your local library is closed, it may still be possible to get these books from them as ebooks.

The CELCIS Knowledge Bank on coronavirus is a source of guidance, information and resources that can be used to support care experienced children and young people during the pandemic.

UNICEF Innocenti have launched an online library of research on how the pandemic is impacting children around the world and their human rights, aiming to fill the knowledge gap on the socio-economic effects of COVID-19.

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