An arrow circling and including people of different genders and ethnicities, one of whom is in a wheelchair.

UNCRC Article 2

All children have these rights

Article 2 says all children have the rights set out in the UNCRC, and individual children and young people shouldn’t be discriminated against when these rights are realised. This covers both direct and indirect discrimination.

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Direct discrimination happens when a person is treated differently because of the way they are.

For example, it happens if someone doesn’t get a job because of their disability or isn’t treated equally because of their race.

Indirect discrimination happens when something applies to everyone in the same way but affects some people unfairly.

For example, if everyone had to climb up a flight of stairs to get to an after school club, this would discriminate against children who couldn’t do that because of disability.

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If you believe you may have been discriminated against the  Equality Advisory Support Service provides advice and assistance on equality and human rights legislation and how it may relate to you.

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If you believe you may have been discriminated against the  Equality Advisory Support Service provides advice and assistance on equality and human rights legislation and how it may relate to you.

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All children and young people have the right to live free from discrimination, and it’s protected for everyone in the UK by the Equality Act.

I’m a child concerned about racism

Childline has a list of things you can do if you or someone you know is experiencing racism. It also has some explanations about why people might be racist in the first place.

I’m a young person concerned about racism

If you or someone you know is experiencing racism, Young Scot has a dedicated page that may help. It has:

  • links to resources that can support you, and
  • ways in which you can take action.

I want to report a hate crime

Young Scot has information on how to report a hate crime if you think you or someone else has experienced one.

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The LGBT Youth Scotland website has advice, information and resources for young people, parents and carers and professionals. There’s a chat line, too (tel. 0131 555 3940).

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Contact provides support and advice for families with disabled children.

Kindred specialises in supporting families with complex needs. They operate a helpline and provide practical information, advocacy support and guidance, as well as a counselling service for parents whose children are in the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh whether on an in-patient or an out-patient basis.

Non-discrimination is a general principle

Non-discrimination is one of the four general principles of the UNCRC, which underpin how it should be interpreted and put into practice.

The four principles are:

Relevant General Comments

The Committee on the Rights of the Child has produced many General Comments that help people understand how the UNCRC works in practice.

Some General Comments that are relevant to Article 2 are:

Days of General Discussion

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child facilitates Days of General Discussion where experts from around the world can discuss a child rights issue in detail. The reports of their discussions are a helpful tool to understand how the UNCRC should be interpreted.

Some Days of General Discussion relevant to Article 2 are:


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